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'21st Century: Art in the First Decade' is an exhibition, publication, blog and series of public programs at the Queensland Art Gallery l Gallery of Modern Art that explore the art of the past ten years. As an expanded platform for the exhibition, the '21st Century Blog' functions as a source book of reference material and contributions provided by artists, curators and writers. Read more

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[William Kentridge's] art is strongly rooted in the traditions of European absurdism, with clear nods to the theatre of Antonin Artaud and Alfred Jarry, as well as Russian constructivism and Russian and German expressionist cinema. His witness to apartheid and its dismantling gives his work a politicised, if not overtly political, narrative that also reflects much of European art and theatre of the early 20th century. And while there is much to be amused by in his jerky automata, overdrawn animations and distorted sculptures, he is quick to warn against misunderstandings of the comedic aspects of absurdism.

Iain Millar, ‘It wasn’t a choice, being an artist was what I was reduced to‘, The Art Newspaper, Issue 217, October 2010

Categories: Artist, Writing

One Response to [William Kentridge's] art is strongly rooted in the traditions of European absurdism, with clear nods to the theatre of Antonin Artaud and Alfred Jarry, as well as Russian constructivism and Russian and German expressionist cinema. His witness to apartheid and its dismantling gives his work a politicised, if not overtly political, narrative that also reflects much of European art and theatre of the early 20th century. And while there is much to be amused by in his jerky automata, overdrawn animations and distorted sculptures, he is quick to warn against misunderstandings of the comedic aspects of absurdism.

  1. By Shar Young

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